ACENOLOGIA | SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ON ENOLOGY
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SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY MORE ARTICLES
(in Spanish)
 

Acenologia is the journal for oenology professionals; the publication explores the scientific and technical innovations of a broad range of issues of oenological interest. The articles and contributions by experts provide an analysis of the current state of the wine industry and its evolution.
Launched in 1997 and published without interruption since, it has become bench mark for Spanish language oenology and viniculture and a leader in global digital oenological publications.
Acenologia publishes articles in English which for easy reference can be found on this page.
Acenologia is accessible to the public and periodically distributes newly published articles to its subscribers.




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New tools for white wine protein stabilization
Matteo Marangon. DAFNAE. Padova (Italy)
No 163 - October 2017

Hazy wines, especially whites, are perceived as faulty by most consumers, so that securing wine stability prior to bottling is an essential step of the winemaking process. Protein instability leading to haze in wines is one of the most important instabilities that winemakers face, particularly for white, rosé and sparkling wine production. If not removed during winemaking, grape proteins will be found in the bottled wines in a soluble state... >>>




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The history of grape rootstocks and how future needs might be addressed
M. Andrew Walker et al. Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California Davis, CA, USA
No 161 - June 2017

Grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) were first detected in France in the middle of the 1860s. They were soon noticed across Europe and eventually devastated most of Europe’s vineyards. Their rapid dispersal suggests that they were widely spread before being noticed, likely on infested rootings from growers and nurseries, and on contaminated equipment... >>>




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Grapevine breeding: recent progress and experiences
Reinhard Töpfer and Rudolf Eibach. JKI Institute for Grapevine Breeding Geilweilerhof, Siebeldingen, Germany
No 161 - June 2017

The development of a new wine grape cultivar is time consuming requiring about 25 to 30 years – almost the span of an employees working life. Plenty examples can be given such as ‘Phoenix’ crossed in 1964 and protected 1992 or ‘Regent’ which was crossed in 1967 and protected in 1994. It is hardly possible to speed up this time span as for quality evaluation at least 5 to 6 years are necessary for a decision in each breeding step... >>>

 



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Interview with François Chartier
«You need to have an open mind to discover aromatic synergies»
Coral Martil. Acenologia
No 134 - December 2012

François Chartier, créateur d’harmonies, is one of the most outstanding sommeliers, an specialist of the flavor science of food and wine. Writer, researcher and chef, he is the only Canadian who has won the prestigious Grand Prix Sopexa International (Paris 1994), an award distinguishing the world’s best sommelier specialized in Fren ch wines and spirits. >>>




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Tailoring oxygen management strategies to winemaking styles. How much oxygen do we need?
Maurizio Ugliano, Jean-Baptiste Dieval and Stéphane Vidal. Nomacorc Oxygen Management Research Center. Domaine de Donadille, Rhodilan, France
No 132 - August 2012

Many key sensory attributes of wines – including color, aroma, and mouthfeel – are affected by the degree of exposure of wine to oxygen. In the modern wine industry, it is largely accepted that inaccurate management of oxygen during winemaking can result in significant loss of quality. >>>




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Novel lactic acid bacteria for use as MLF starter cultures
Maret du Toit. Institute for Wine Biotechnology, Department of Viticulture and Oenology Stellenbosch University, Matieland, South Africa
No 131 - April 2012

François Chartier, créateur d’harmonies, is one of the most outstanding sommeliers, an specialist of the flavor science of food and wine. Writer, researcher and chef, he is the only Canadian who has won the prestigious Grand Prix Sopexa International (Paris 1994), an award distinguishing the world’s best sommelier specialized in Fren ch wines and spirits. >>>




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Interview with Roger B. Boulton
«Both white wines and red wines can consume oxygen at similar rates»
María del Álamo and Ignacio Nevares. UVaMOX. Universidad de Valladolid. Palencia
No 130 - June 2012

The oxygen consuming reactions in wine have puzzled researchers and winemakers for more than a century. While it is widely known that the phenolic components form the main substrates, and that acetaldehyde is the main characteristic sensory product, it does not seem to be widely understood that the oxygen consumption is the rate-limiting reaction. >>>




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Interview with Sibylle Krieger-Weber
«Some yeast metabolites can be used as pre-cursors for the production of aromatic compounds»
Sergi Ferrer. ENOLAB. Universitat de València
No 128 - December 2011

Dr. Krieger performed the following duties: research, development and marketing of Bitec starter cultures for MLF, microbiological laboratory manager, R&D biotechnology manager, assistant manager of the Gewürzmüller quality control laboratories and manager of the Bitec malolactic bacteria starter culture plant. In 1999, Dr. Krieger joined Lallemand, where she has been responsible for malolactic bacteria starter culture research and development as well as technical support of the wine markets worldwide. >>>




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Re-evaluation of redox potential measurements in wine
Paul A. Kilmartin. Wine Science Programme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
No 115 - March 2010

Oxidation and reduction reactions play a key role in wine maturation, throughout fermentation, in the tank or barrel, and during more lengthy bottle aging. A measure of the tendency of wine components to be oxidized or reduced would be a welcome aid to the winemaker in making decisions about how a wine is to be handled. >>>




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Interview with Andy Walker
The patterns and varieties selection
Enric Bartra, Carme Domingo and Anna Puig. Institut Català de la Vinya i el Vi (INCAVI), Vilafranca del Penedès
No 114 - January 2010

Dr. M. Andrew Walker, geneticist and professor at the Viticulture and Enology Department of the University of California Davis, manages one of the most outstanding laboratories in the world specialized in the study of the genetics applied to the different diseases that affect the grapevine. >>>




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Results and perspectives of resistance breeding in grapes
Rudolf Eibach and Reinhard Töpfer. Federal Centre for Breeding Research on Cultivated Plants. Institute for Grapevine Breeding Geilweilerhof. Siebeldingen, Germany
No 46 - June 2004

Breeding, generally spoken, is aiming at the improvement of crop plants e.g. for yield, product quality, specific resistances etc. Considering grapevine breeding some peculiarities need to be reminded. Grapevine is a vegetatively propagated, perennial crop, highly heterozygous, suffering from inbreeding depression, yielding fruits to be used either as table grapes or for wine making.  >>>




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How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?
Hans R. Schultz. Institut für Weinbau und Rebenzüchtung. Fachgebiet Weinbau, Forschungsanstalt. Geisenheim, Germany
No 23 - July 2002

Global climate change has been a public discussion topic for several years. It is difficult to predict changes in climate and sea level due to the enhancement of the so-called greenhouse effect (including temperature rise, CO2 increase, and nitrogen deposition) but atmospheric CO2 concentration is measurably increasing and is expected to double current levels during the next century with marked effects on current agroclimatic conditions. >>>




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Status of grapevine canopy management and future prospects
J.J. (Kobus) Hunter and Eben Archer. ARC Institute for Fruit, Vine and Wine, ARC Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, and Department of Viticulture and Oenology, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa
No 21 - May 2002

In order to meet challenges of ever increasing national and international market competition and requirements, Wine Industries all over the world are committed to increase grape and wine quality. A question that is often asked is: Why is canopy management important in this regard? The answer is simply that everything affecting the performance of the grapevine is eventually reflected its canopy. >>>