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Figure 1 Temperature development in comparison to the long term mean in different seasons in the northern hemisphere since 1856. Letters are abbreviations for months (DJF: December, January, February; MAM: March, April, May; JJA: June, July, August; SON: September, October, November) (Jones et al., 2001).

Figure 1 / Hans R. Schultz: How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?">
Figure 2 Varietal suitability calculated based on the Huglin Index for Geisenheim, Germany. The estimates for the next 50 years are based on a simulation of temperature development by the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research (PIK). The calculations up to the year 2000 are based on temperature data from Deutscher Wetterdienst, Geschäftsstelle Geisenheim.

Figure 2 / Hans R. Schultz: How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?">
Figure 3 Predicted distribution of precipitation across Europe in winter based on past climatic trends by Schönwiese and Rapp (1997).

Figure 3 / Hans R. Schultz: How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?">
Figure 4 Predicted distribution of precipitation across Europe in summer based on past climatic trends by Schönwiese and Rapp (1997).

Figure 4 / Hans R. Schultz: How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?">
Figure 5
Box A: Ambient CO2 concentration since 1958 from samples taken at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

Box B: Predicted development of CO2 concentration until the end of this century according to assumptions made for a ´business as usual scenario´ by the 1992 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Data for A are from Keeling and Whorf (1999), Scripps Intitution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, CA 92093-0244. Data for B are from Wuebbles and Jain (1999) and assume:

1) world population of 11.3 billion by 2100
2) economic growth at 2.9% for 1990-2025, 2.3% for 1990-2100
3) energy supplies of 12.000 EJ conventional oil, 13.000 EJ natural gas, solar costs decreasing to $0.075/kWh, 191 EJ biofuels available at $70/barrel
4) internationally agreed controls on SOx, NOx, (sulfur and nitrogen oxides) and non-CH4 (methane) volatile organic compound emissions
5) partial compliance with Montreal Protocol, with gradual phase out of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) in non-signatory countries by 2075.

Figure 5 / Hans R. Schultz: How may climate change affect viticulture in Europe?">
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